Statement

I am drawn to subjects I find to be incongruous, and have often been told that I see things that others  don’t pay attention to.  As I’m taking pictures I think a lot about the passage of time and the people who once lived there.  The images I capture speak to me in a variety of ways, fulfilling an insatiable curiosity about the world and everything in it.

Through the viewfinder is a world in color, but I imagine what I see to be monotone.  I also like to work with color, but feel that monotone gives my work a gravitas that cannot be achieved with color.  I’ve always been drawn to the work of the great Parisian photographer Eugene Atget (1857-1927), and especially his use of tonality.

As I photograph, I make adjustments to the composition and perspective.  I also make changes based on how I foresee the image will look printed on paper.  I’ve used a lot of cameras over the years but prefer digital because I like immediacy.  When I started getting serious about photography digital cameras didn’t exist, nor did personal computers or cell phones.  I used a Macintosh computers early on but they were very primitive by today’s standards, just to add a simple filter would take hours.

I like to come back to themes and been working on the “Passages” and “Sylvester Manor” series for several years.  For me, it’s exciting to see how things change over time and sometimes disappear altogether.  I prefer quiet places where I can spend time thinking about each subject without interruption, but sometimes that’s not possible.  Some places I know about and some places I find by chance.

Biography

Gary Beeber is an award-winning American photographer and filmmaker who has exhibited in galleries and museums throughout the world.  He has had numerous solo photography exhibitions and his documentary films have been screened at over 150 film festivals.  Pfizer Pharmaceutical, Goldman Sachs and Chase Bank are Fortune 500 companies who collect his work.